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| Last Updated:: 14/02/2017

Mandore Gardens

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mandore is a town located 9 km north of Jodhpur city, in the Indian state of Rajasthan. This Garden is a heritage spot. What make the Mandore gardens different from other gardens are the remnants of history that it houses within its complex.

 

 

 

Mythologically, Mandore is the said to be the birthplace of Mandodari (Ravana's wife in Ramayana). Historically, it was the capital city of Rathore Clan. This heritage place lost its shine after Rao Jodha found the city of Jodhpur and shifted to Mehrangarh Fort. After the town was abandoned the garden remained as a reminder of its glorious past. This garden has a high rock terrace, which is its most prominent attraction.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The ruined fort and palace survive on the hilltop and the gardens below have become a public park with fountains and the cenotaphs of Jodhpur's maharajas - who presumably continued to use the gardens after moving to the Meherangarh in Jodhpur. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 
Cenotaphs (dewals) of Jodhpur's erstwhile rulers are dotted across this landscaped garden, which are different from those found in other regions of Rajasthan. These red sandstone cenotaphs resemble Hindu temples and have four storeys, elaborately designed columns and tall spires. Notable amongst these dewals include the memorial dedicated to Maharaja Ajit Singh and other built for the Maharani atop a hill.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Near to the cenotaphs is the hall of heroes. The hall is dedicated to various deities and Rajput folk heroes. The statues of the deities and heroes we are carved out of rock and painted in bright colours. Also in this garden of Jodhpur, is "The Shrine of the Three Hundred Million Gods", filled with brightly colored images of the various Hindu Gods. On climbing the nearby hill, visitors get to see the old palace and ruins of Mandore.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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