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| Last Updated:: 03/10/2016

Chamundi Hills

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chamundi Hills is located 13 km east of Mysore, the Palace City, in Karnataka, India. Its average elevation is 1,000 metres (3,300 ft). Chamundi Hill is about 13 kms from Mysore, which is a prominent city in Karnataka State, India. Chamundi Hills is famous not only in India but also abroad. Atop the hill is the famous Sri Chamundeswari Temple. ‘Chamundi’ or ‘Durga’ is the fierce form of ‘Shakti’. She is the slayer of demons, ‘Chanda’ and ‘Munda’ and also ‘Mahishasura’, the buffalo-headed monster.

 

 

She is the tutelary deity of the Mysore Maharajas and the presiding deity of Mysore. For several centuries they have held the Goddess, Chamundeswari, in great reverence.

 

 

‘Skanda Purana’ and other ancient texts mention a sacred place called ‘Trimuta Kshetra’ surrounded by eight hills. Lying on the western side is the Chamundi Hills, one among the eight hills. In the earlier days, the hill was identified as ‘Mahabaladri’ in honour of God Shiva who resides in the ‘Mahabaleswara Temple’. This is the oldest temple on the hills.

 

 

In the later days, the hill came to be known as ‘Chamundi Hills’ in honour of the Goddess Chamundi, the chief subject of the ‘Devi Mahathme’. A large number of devotees from all over the country and from abroad visit the temple every year. They believe that the Goddess fulfils their desires and aspirations. Since the early days of the Maharajahs of Mysore, the idol of goddess Chamundi has been carried on a decorated elephant as part of the celebrations in the annual Dusshera festival.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Besides the Chamundi and the Mahabaleswara temples, there are a few more temples atop the hills. There are also some interesting spots and the monolith statue of ‘Nandi’ is among them.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The hill has played a vital role in the ecology and climate of the city of Mysore. It is the repository of wide bio-diversity and also acts as a watershed. The hill also acts as a source of ground water recharging. This fact was well recognized by the Maharaja’s of Mysore and several lakes were developed such as   the Karanji, Devikere, Dalvoy, and Lingambudhi lakes. Tanks and ponds were also dug. These water bodies acted as the main water source for the surrounding villages.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Source:

 https://abhirama.files.wordpress.com/2010/04/img_2226.jpg

http://chamundeshwaritemple.kar.nic.in/about.html